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Technical features of the Krauss Tank: Pictures left and below with engine cab removed reveal some of the armatures and controls. Visible are the push type water pump fitted inside the water tank. Located on the Right side of the chassis is the vertical butane tank with extended filler valve on the top. A push type blower valve is provided to clear air bubbles from the gauge glass or blow down the boiler. The steam oil tank and Johnson bar are visible on the RH side of the locomotive. The gas burner valve and throttle lever are located on the centerline. The rear buffer beam incorporates a gas and feed water line adaptor for use with the Aster utility car. The locomotive features a feedwater axle pump, front and rear mounted European type hook and loop couplers with a single centerline buffer as well as LGB type couplers.

As of August 22nd 2017 the entire Krauss production has sold out. Thank you for your patronage.

Krauss Tank Narrow gauge logging locomotive

1/20 G - Scale

Short History of the Krauss T locomotive / IYO Logging Railway:

Lokomotivfabrik Krauss & Company was founded in Munich Germany in 1866 by Georg von Krauss. In 1931 Krauss Merged with Maffei and became Krauss-Maffei which was a prime locomotive builder for the Bavarian State Railways.

The first two Krauss Tank locomotives imported to Japan in 1888 were purchased by the IYO Railway located in Matsuyama on Shikoku Island in Southwestern Japan. Two more units were added later and kept in service until 1954. Several other railways also purchased Krauss locomotives because of their practical design and solid construction. The Krauss Tank engines are known in Japan as "Bochan train" after a famous novel written by Soseki Natsume more than 100 years ago. One of the original Krauss engines imported in 8188 is preserved on static display in Umezu-dera park owned by IYO Railways (pictured below).

In addition, two Diesel powered "Bochan Trains" manufactured by a Japanese company are now operating in Matsuyama on a daily bases pulling passenger coaches. Their popularity has become an important tourist attraction to the local community.